Where We Monitor

Water Quality Monitoring Sites

On Tuesdays

S1: Maine/New Hampshire Border along Routes 302 and 113

Conway, NH
Saco River

S2: Weston’s Beach along Route 113

Fryeburg, ME
Saco River

S3: Fiddlehead Campground off Route 5

Fryeburg, ME
Saco River

OCS4A: Off Route 5 Bridge in Fryeburg

Fryeburg, ME
Old Course of Saco River

OCS4B: Old Course Downstream of Hemlock Bridge

Fryeburg, ME
Old Course of Saco River

OCS4C: Old Course Upstream of Route 5 Bridge

Fryeburg, ME
Old Course of Saco River

S5: Upriver of Brownfield Bog off Walkers Bridge Road

Fryeburg, ME
Saco River

S6: Downriver of Brownfield Bog off Route 160

Brownfield, ME
Saco River

MPB22: Below Moose Pond off Route 160

Denmark, ME
Saco River

On Wednesdays

O7: Maine/New Hampshire Border off Huntress Bridge Road

Freedom, NH
Ossipee River

O8: Downriver of Kezar Falls Village off Powerhouse Road

Parsonsfield, ME
Ossipee River

OS9: Baldwin/Cornish Station Bridge along Routes 5 and 117

Cornish, ME
Ossipee River

S10: Off Route 11

Standish, ME
Saco River

S23: Below Hiram Dam off River Road

Hiram, ME
Saco River

S24: Below Watchic Pond Dam off Hi-Vu Drive

Standish, ME
Saco River

On Thursdays

LO11: Maine/New Hampshire Border off Whitehouse Road

Wakefield, NH
Balch Lake

LO12: Below Balch Lake Dam off Acton Ridge Road

Newfield, ME
Little Ossipee River

LO13: Below Shapleigh Pond off Main Street

Shapleigh, ME
Little Ossipee River

LO14: Off Silver Lane

Limerick, ME
Little Ossipee Flowage

LO15: Below Lake Arrowhead off Route 117

Limington, ME
Little Ossipee River

LO16: Off Hardscrabble Road

Limington, ME
Little Ossipee River

LO25: Below Little Ossipee Pond off Chadbourne Ridge Road

Waterboro, ME
Little Ossipee River

On Fridays

S17: Bonny Eagle Island off Route 35

Standish, ME
Saco River

S18: Near site of old Rogers Fibre Mill off Depot Street

Buxton, ME
Saco River

S19U: Above Skelton Dam

Dayton, ME
Saco River

S20: Off South Street

Biddeford, ME
Saco River

S21: Public Boat Launch off Front Street

Saco, ME
Saco River

SPB26: Swan Pond Brook

Biddeford, ME
Swan Pond Brook

TB27: Thatcher Brook

Biddeford, ME
Thatcher Brook

With a corridor that flows along over 170 miles of river, it is to be expected that the lands adjacent to the waterway experience many different uses. If one were to look at a map of the Saco River Corridor Region, they would see an excellent example of those different uses. As the Saco River enters the state of Maine in Fryeburg and flows south through Brownfield, Denmark, and Hiram, it sees high agricultural and recreational use. As the Saco reaches Cornish and Baldwin, it is joined from the west by the Ossipee River after its 18-mile journey from Ossipee Lake in New Hampshire.

The Ossipee sees a mix of residential, agricultural, and industrial uses as it flows through the villages of Porter and Parsonsfield, Maine. The waters of the Saco and the Ossipee continue through a short distance of residential areas in Limington and Standish — including a couple of campgrounds and a popular swimming spot at the Limington Rapids — before being joined again from the west by the Little Ossipee River. At the confluence of the Little Ossipee and the Saco Rivers, the Little Ossipee has already traveled a distance of 31 miles.

The Little Ossipee sees high residential development as found on the shores of Balch Pond in Acton and Newfield, Shapleigh Pond in Shapleigh, and the Little Ossipee Flowage (Lake Arrowhead) in Limerick and Waterboro. The combined waters of these three great rivers travel through the towns of Buxton and Hollis passing the sites of existing mills and those long forgotten. As they search for the sea, they finally flow through the quiet landscapes of Dayton and then on to the high demands of Biddeford and Saco including commercial, industrial, and residential uses. Here the river reaches what could be considered its highest and most critical use — that of a drinking water reservoir. Although this is where the water is drawn from the Saco River by the Biddeford and Saco Water Company, its quality has been affected by all land and water uses from its origin and the origins of the three major tributaries.

When choosing the sites for our program, we tried to pinpoint those areas most critical to the rivers and the communities they support. For example, we chose to test all three rivers as they enter the state of Maine from New Hampshire to give us an idea of the quality of water as it enters the state and the regulatory jurisdiction of the Saco River Corridor Act. It was also very important for us to have each municipality represented. Although at this point it is financially impossible for us to physically take a water sample in each municipality, our testing locations do provide each municipality with data that represents the waters flowing through its community. As the program grows we continually research additional site locations.